WASHINGTON, D.C. — Maybe he should have gotten the MRI after all. Noah Syndergaard grabbed his right shoulder after a 90 mile-an-hour changeup on Sunday and quickly walked off the field after grabbing his under-arm lat area, leaving his start in the second inning.


The big righthander seemed to mouth the words “my lat” to trainer Ray Ramirez.


Syndergaard had been skipped Thursday with what the team said was “biceps tendinitis,” but had refused to have an MRI on the arm because he was feeling better. Mets GM Sandy Alderson said Saturday that while that was not normal procedure, “but I can’t tie him down and throw him in the tube either.”


Syndergaard had thrown a bullpen Friday and felt no discomfort in the hours afterward. That was what gave the Mets confidence to start him on Sunday.

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“He’s downplayed the injury quite a bit and said he could have pitched the other day as well. We didn’t have him pitch because we wanted to be careful,” Alderson said on the decision to start Syndergaard Sunday. “He’s been adamant over the last several days he’s ready to go. We just wanted to have that affirmed after he threw yesterday.”


Syndergaard got shelled early Sunday. He gave up five runs on five hits and the first walk he has issued this season. He had just gotten Jayson Werth to line out to shortstop when he threw a changeup to Bryce Harper and came off the mound holding his side.


Sean Gilmartin came in to relieve Syndergaard with one out in the second.


It’s the second straight star the Mets have had “come back” and then have to leave the game due to injury in the last week.

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Yoenis Cespedes was placed on the disabled list Friday with a strained left hamstring after pulling up lame running to second base on Thursday. Cespedes had been pulled from a game April 20 after feeling what he described as “a shock” in his left hamstring. He sat out the three-game weekend series with the Nationals and got two more days of rest with an off day on Monday and a rain out on Tuesday.


In his second game back, he couldn’t walk off the field on his own.


Cespedes himself said the leg felt fine, and no player can insert himself back into the lineup without being cleared by the Mets medical and training staff.


Last year, he also tried to play through a leg issue. The Mets tried to manage his quad injury with days off rather than put him immediately on the disabled list. He ended up on the DL anyway in August.

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Alderson said that a player’s input plays a big part into how the Mets handle his injuries.


“All of these decisions are made with feedback from the player,” Alderson said. “It’s not that simple as simply saying we know this and know that. Without taking into account the patient. Which is what the doctors do all the time.”

Tags:
mlb
sports injuries
new york mets
noah syndergaard
washington nationals

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